Posted in Man Repeller

Shop With Me in the Comments (and Over Video Call!)

For “Whatever You Want” week, I’d like to hang out inside your closet, if you don’t mind. Consider this fantasy an extension of the comment section underneath this story, where I had the pleasure of assisting MR readers with a litany of shopping inquiries, from the perfect big-boob-friendly red one-piece swimsuit to tapestry loafers you can wear at home.

I had so much fun, I’m doing it again, so feel free to leave shopping requests in the comments. Here are three questions to answer if you do:

  1. What are you looking for? (Send me a link to something similar, an inspo image, a description, etc.)
  2. Are there any challenges or specifications I should keep in mind? (Price, sizing, material, etc.)
  3. What’s one word that describes how you want to feel when wearing this item?

Keep checking back to see my response! I’ll be answering all week.

Here’s something new, though: I’m also extending my services beyond the comments–which is where the aforementioned closet hangout comes in–with styling tips and wardrobe curation advice via video call. During a 30-minute session, we’ll go through your closet together, focusing on items you wear often but want to bring new energy to, and items that are neglected but you’d love to wear more. I’ll suggest some styling ideas on the call, and within 10 days of the appointment, I’ll also send you a packet of shopping links to items you might like to round things out, with a focus on Black-owned businesses.

The first five people to ask for a video session in the comments will get one for zero-point-zero dollars. Be sure to include your IG handle (or email if you prefer) and I’ll get in touch to schedule it.

Can’t wait to hang!

The post Shop With Me in the Comments (and Over Video Call!) appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

Summer’s Simplest (But Arguably Best) Outfit Recipe

I can basically get through summer wearing nothing but some variation of this uniform: 1 part denim shorts, 1 part white shirt. Which denim shorts? Which white shirt? That’s the magic part. Start with whatever’s in your closet, and get creative.

That’s what I did here, in collaboration with two of my denim-shorts-and-white-top-wearing friends, Samra and Patricia. To come up with our ideas, we dove into conversations with you on Man Repeller’s Thoughtline and explored the comments from this personal shopping story. Here, our best bets for styling these two summer staples.

Make it Short and Sweet, by me (Elizabeth)

A vintage white blouse is one step more stylish than a plain, white tee—and it requires fewer accessories to pull everything together. I recommend a vintage cotton option with fun embroidery or other detailing. When buying a vintage blouse, check your material! Breathable linen or cotton will treat you best in hot weather. The sleeves will stay rolled-up far better than, say, silk, when it gets too hot to have your arms fully covered.

I paired my cotton shirt with a pair of casual cut-offs to tone down the top’s sweetness. I’ve had these shorts for many years; to keep them soft, I wash them minimally and let them have some time in the sun—giving them a bit of a fade, which I like. For a pair that’s a bit more fun, I very much love these $55 upcycled shorts from Studio One Eighty Nine, which come in size XS to XXXL.

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Samra Michael Embraces Length

Denim Shorts and White Blouses

I tucked my white sleeveless mock-neck top into my black denim Bermuda shorts, offsetting the casual combination with a pair of white loafers. I kept my accessories simple yet fun by mixing a pair of silver abstract earrings, a gold watch, and my favorite funky rings.

Bermuda shorts have been a staple in my wardrobe because I find them to be figure-flattering and also pair nicely with crop tops and cute kicks. You could say this is my summer uniform. I am also really just a sucker for longer-length shorts in general: linen, denim, low-rise, high-rise, distressed, I’m here for all of it. As for the top half: I paired the long shorts with the sleeveless top because I enjoy the little-top-big-pants aesthetic.

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Patricia Nygaard Deconstructs The Basics

Denim Shorts and White Blouses

Here’s the simple approach: I was inspired to mirror the knots on my favorite white knotted sandalsWhite button ups feel really proper to me, so having a deep open-neck and wearing it braless is a fun play on a classic look.

Denim Shorts and White Blouses

To take it a step further, I tied the sleeves around my chest and tucked away the ends of each sleeve. From there, I brought the tails of the shirt around the front to my waist. 

The tube top inversion creates an easy canvas for accessories, so I’m wearing all my staples: jewelry passed on from family and given to me by sweet friends. The fan is a summer essential from Glazed NYC’s 2019 “Follow Me” collection, created by my friends Shelby Macklin and Banna Nega, and it paired perfectly with these vintage gold foil and lucite heels.

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How do you wear your summer uniform? Any additional summer market requests for us? Pop ‘em in the comments below!

The post Summer’s Simplest (But Arguably Best) Outfit Recipe appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

An Ethically-Made Swimsuit for Your Fire Escape This Summer? All Signs Point to lemlem

In this series, Man Repeller shines a light on standout independent, Black-owned fashion labels we think you should know about (and shop from!). And in turn, they’re passing the baton and spotlighting a handful of businesses they know and love. Today we have Liya Kebede, founder and creative director of lemlem.


The brand:

lemlem, an ethical label informed by Kebede’s Ethiopian roots with all garments and goods made by local artisans in Africa.

View this post on Instagram

To everyone who has recently joined our Lemlem family, who has tagged us and shared the love, thank you 💜 To everyone who after all these years is with us, welcome home ⭐ Lemlem in Amharic means to bloom. To flourish. And maybe there is no better time to give the opportunity to small, ethical brands made in Africa to do exactly that. To Grow. We started Lemlem in Ethiopia to support local weavers in finding a market for their craft. It has since expanded with swimwear in Morocco and ready to wear in Kenya. But it is, we hope, so much more than this. With every purchase, you also help support the mission of our foundation to help women artisans in Africa thrive by connecting them to healthcare, education and pathways to jobs. With every purchase, you support another artisan and by definition their extended family, who often come and learn the art of weaving, passed on to the next generations in a beautifully poetic, cyclical manner. We believe that change is on its way and NOW more than ever, we will pursue our work and our mission. THANKS TO YOU. Your continued support over the years and especially during these challenging times has given us hope anew to make the world a better place. Together 💜

A post shared by lemlem (@lemlemofficial) on

The designer:

Liya Kebede

If we drew a three-adjective Venn diagram, lemlem would sit in the center of:

Breezy, gossamery, conscientious

Fantasy scenario:

Okay, this isn’t as far-fetched a fantasy as the rest. You’re keen to get Vitamin D from something other than a lemon-colored supplement. The term “tanline” sounds archaic to your ears. You want one swimsuit for the summer so that you can bask in some sunshine during your lunch break. You ask your friend where she got that swimsuit of hers that you’ve always loved so much, and from there it’s a beeline to the lemlem website. Do you get the orange high-waisted bottoms with a triangle bikini or an off-the-shoulder top? A ballet-inspired one-piece, or maybe this one that ties at the shoulders? Unless it’s time for this olive-colored string bikini? Or is this summer more about the halter-and-belt combo? Once you narrow it down to a winner, you’re one beach towel away from splaying out comfortably on your fire escape.

Black entrepreneurship in the Kebede’s words:

“The double tragedies and heartbreaking losses of these past weeks—from the violence and the pandemic—remind me once again that we have to work together to break down barriers to justice, health, and opportunities—for everyone. Today, I’m focused harder than ever on our mission at lemlem, and redoubling our efforts to create good jobs and opportunities for Black artisans to have a path into the fashion market, to share and have their beautiful craftsmanship recognized.”

lemlem

I. Victor Glemaud, II. Studio One Eighty Nine, III. Brother Vellies.


Want more? Check out MR Market Strategist Elizabeth Tamkin’s database of more than 600 Black-owned brands, along with some of her personal shopping recommendations. If you have a suggestion that you think should be added, please share it in the comments.

The post An Ethically-Made Swimsuit for Your Fire Escape This Summer? All Signs Point to lemlem appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

Swimsuits, Sandals, and More, From Brands That Are Giving Back and on Sale

The way we choose to spend our money has always been a political decision, and in this moment of historic unemployment and massive social change, each person’s shopping checklist may look a little bit different. We usually do a summer sale story around this time of year, and we decided that this time it would be most helpful to divide it into sections that make it easy to shop according to your needs or priorities right now. Below, you’ll find our edit of discounted pieces, for those keeping a close eye on their bank account, and a section for brands giving back, for those who want to make a positive impact with their spending.

This list will be updated over the next few weeks as sales are updated, so check back regularly.

Small Things to Spruce Up Your Shorts and Tee

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Speaking of Shorts…

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Swimwear Because it is Indeed Summer

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Sandals, Sneakers and a Couple of Flats for Summer

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Brands Giving Back:

AGMES – Donating 100% of net proceeds from their 5 best-selling styles to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund through the end of June.
Anastasia Beverly Hills – Pledged to donate $1 million to various organizations. You can shop the sale of 25% summer favorites.
BrooklinenDonating to Black Lives Matter, Campaign Zero and Act Blue Bail Funds. You can shop the summer sale here.
By ChariDonating to women and youth organizations including Equal Justice Initiative, NAACP, Black Girls Code, Girl Trek, and The Loveland Foundation for the remainder of June. You can shop their sale assortment here.
Café Forgot – Donating 100% of total sales from Café Forgot’s Donations Shop will go to Black Lives Matter.
Citizens of Humanity – Donating 100% of the retail selling price from website sales of masks to various causes fighting injustice for the month of June.
COCOACENTRIC – Donating 10% of online sales to the organization Until Freedom.
DONNIDonating a portion of sales this season to The Bail Project. You can shop their sale here.
Eileen Fisher – $25,000 donation to the Loveland Foundation and a $25,000 donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. You can shop with an extra discount on sale items.
Frankie’s Bikinis – 20% of the proceeds from The Pride Collection will be donated to the Stonewall Community Foundation to support their mission to assist the LGBTQ+ community as well as specific Covid-19 related projects they are spearheading.
Glossier – Committing $500K in the form of grants to Black-owned beauty businesses.
Harlem Candle Company – Donating a portion of profits from the entire month of June to A Better Chance in celebration of Juneteenth and the Black Live Matter movement,
Honest BeautyPledged to donate $100,000 to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Equal Justice Initiative.
I’MMANY – Donating 30% of the profits from their Flower Power Collection to The Loveland Foundation.
J.Hannah – All website proceeds from J.Hannah’s Dune nail polish will be donated to human rights non-profits like the Minnesota Freedom Fund, LA CAN, the NAACP.
Jacqueline Loekito – Donating 25% of the profits of the “Love Unites US” T-shirt to The Okra Project.
Jibri – Buy a mask and Jibri will donate to a worker on the front lines.
LACAUSA Continuing to make contributions to the NAACP, Lunch on Me, and LA Food Bank and has previously donated to The Okra Project and Black Lives Matter LA.
MAC Cosmetics – Pledging $250K to nonprofit organizations fighting racial injustice and a 500% match to employee donations.
Marques’Almeida – 20% of every purchase will be donated to Black Lives Matter.
Mented Cosmetics – Donating a portion of every sale to support protestors around the country for entire month of June.
MIKOH – 30% off sales items with code ‘FIREWORK30’ from 7/1 – 7/5.
NikePledged to donate $40 million over the course of four years to social justice organizations that support the Black Lives Matter movement.
Nili Lotan – Launched NL Giving Back which offers discounted pieces from previous seasons and donates 10% of proceeds to the NAACP’S Legal Defense and Education Fund.
Nomasei – Donating 10% of proceeds through the month of July to The Loveland Foundation.
Noto Botanics – Donating a portion of profits of the Agender Oil to civil rights-based organizations.
NOTTE – Donated 20% of proceeds from last week’s sale to Black Girls Smile. The brand is also currently donating 50% of the proceeds from the collection to Food Bank for New York, as an on-going donation program. You can use code ‘TAKECARE’ for 10% off your order.
Outdoor Voices – Donating $25k to Black Lives Matter Global Network.
Pamela Love – 10% of jewelry sales and 100% of candle sales will be donated to Campaign Zero and Black Lives Matter through the month of June.
Peter Do – 100% of net profits from website sales to be donated to Black-founded organizations and frontline charities for the entire month of June.
Sephora – Participating in the 15% Pledge, dedicating 15% of their inventory to Black-owned businesses.
SETActive – Donating a portion of all sales from the month of June to the NAACP.
Staud – 10% of online sales will be donated to Color of Change for the month of June. You can shop their sale here.
SVNR – Designer Christina Tung is facilitating the distribution of masks at NYC protests and has coordinated 3500 masks directly to BLM organizers to date.
The Mighty Company – 20% of all profits from the collection will be donated to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
Vernon François – Donating 35% of online sales to organizations dedicated to the fight of racism and injustice for the entire month of June.
Veronica Beard – Veronica Beard’s Gives Back partnership with​ Good+Foundation is providing critical goods for low-income parents and caregivers and has set up a Good+ Crisis Fund to aid those in need. Veronica Beard will be donating a portion of sales from every online transaction to the cause.
Whimsy + Row – Participating in the 15% Pledge, dedicating 15% of their inventory to Black-owned businesses plus they have donated to the George Floyd Memorial Fund, Black Lives Matter, Black Vision Collective, and Reclaim the Block.
YanYan Knits – 20% of the total online sales from June and July will go to The Loveland Foundation.
Zadig & Voltaire – 100% of the proceeds from their Art is Hope Collection will be donated to Black Art In America. You can shop the sale with offerings up to 40% off with code ‘ARTISHOPE.’

Brands Offering Discounts:

& Other Stories – Up to 60% off.
Adidas – Up to 50% off.
Alex Mill – Sale assortment on women’s and men’s.
Alpha Industries – 50% off sale.
Andrea Iyamah – Price reductions in swim and ready-to-wear.
Another Feather – Summer sale assortment.
ASOS – Up to 80% off.
Bagatiba – 15% off with code SMALLBIZ15
Coco & Breezy – Up to 40% off select styles.
Cushnie – Up to 55% off the Resort and Spring collections.
Eloquii – Up to 80% off with code ‘SALETIME.’
Farfetch – Up to 50% off.
Galerie LA – End of Season sale.
J.Crew – Extra 60% off sale styles with code ‘SALEAWAY.’
Jade Swim – Sale swimwear plus subscribe & receive 10% off your first order.
Kai Collective – Up to 79% off.
Karl Kani – Sale assortment plus subscribe & receive 10% off your first order.
Kirna Zabete – Up to 70% off.
Lemlem – Sale assortment plus subscribe & receive 10% off your first order.
Luisa Via Roma – 30-60+% off select styles
Machete – Up to 70% off past seasons.
Maison de Mode – Sale assortment plus subscribe & receive 10% off your first order.
Mansur Gavriel – 30-50% off basics and luxe accessories.
Martine Rose – Sale assortment on site.
Maryam Nassir Zadeh – 30% off select styles.
MATCHESFASHION – Up to 60% off.
Merlette – Summer sale assortment.
Need Supply – Up to 60% off.
Net-a-Porter – Up to 50% off.
Nordstrom – Up to 40% off.
Nubian Skin – Select items on sale.
Oak + Fort – Up to 50% off.
The OUTNET – Up to 70% off.
PacSun – Up to 50% off site-wide.
Sachin & Babi – 50% off with code ‘JULY450.’
Saks Fifth Avenue – Up to 70% off Designer Sale.
Selva Negra – Sale assortment on site.
Solid & Striped – Sale assortment on site.
SSENSE – Up to 70% off.
Swimsuits for All – Extra 40% off already reduced prices.
Topshop – Rotating discounts on different categories of summer styles.
Tory Burch and Tory Sport – Up to 60% off with code ‘EXTRA.’
Totokaelo – Up to 60% off.
TOVE – Sale assortment on site.
Universal Standard – Shop capsules and save 25%.
Verishop – Up to 70% off.
WANT Les Essentials – 50% off sale.
Wales Bonner – Sale assortment on site.
The Webster – Up to 60% off.
William Okpo – 10% off first time purchase with code ‘OKPOLOVE’ at checkout.
Yevu Clothing – Sale assortment on site.
Yoox – Up to 40% off plus clearance section.
Zouxou – Sale assortment on site.

Feature Image via Marques’Almeida.

The post Swimsuits, Sandals, and More, From Brands That Are Giving Back and on Sale appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

For Future Wedding Guests and Future Brides, Cushnie Is a Bold, Bright Light 

In this series, Man Repeller shines a light on standout independent, Black-owned fashion labels we think you should know about (and shop from!). And in turn, they’re passing the baton and spotlighting a handful of businesses and brands they know and love. Today we have Carly Cushnie, CEO and creative director of CUSHNIE.


The brand:

CUSHNIE, a luxury women’s ready-to-wear and bridal collection.

The designers:

Carly Cushnie

If we drew a three-adjective Venn diagram, Cushnie would sit in the center of:

Diaphanous, liquid, asymmetrical

Fantasy scenario:

You’re planning a wedding and you’ve been scanning resale sites for months, trying to manifest the lush garment in your mind’s eye. For inking the deal at City Hall, you’ve been dreaming about a stark white blazer, equal parts tailored and gauzy, paired with split-hem pants that feel fancy. The party part comes a few days later, in a friend’s backyard. You’d like your festive dress to meet one, sole criterion: It must be so unfussy that it only has one zipper, and no other accoutrements. Ideally it’s something drapey in a seafoamy color, something with sleeves in the color of your favorite leafstalk, or a shock of Talenti sorbet pink that you can shimmy into and forget about for the rest of the night. One night, a few weeks before the decisive matrimonial moment, you stumble across the Cushnie website, and you can’t believe your luck.

Black entrepreneurship in Cushnie’s words:

 “I’m really proud of what I’ve accomplished over the last 12 years of having my business. Especially because when I was coming up in the industry, there were very few Black role models for me to follow and learn from. I am sad that it has taken all of this protesting and loss of life for people to really stop and pay attention to Black-owned brands, but I can only hope that this is one of the first steps in making real progress in acknowledging Black talent and our contribution.”

cushnie

 I. Harlem Candle Company, II. Omi Woods, III. Hanahana Beauty, IV. Mateo New York.


Want more? Check out MR Market Strategist Elizabeth Tamkin’s database of more than 600 Black-owned brands, along with some of her personal shopping recommendations. If you have a suggestion that you think should be added, please share it in the comments.

The post For Future Wedding Guests and Future Brides, Cushnie Is a Bold, Bright Light  appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

We’re Dreaming About First-Date Outfits, Thanks to William Okpo

In this series, Man Repeller shines a light on standout independent, Black-owned fashion labels we think you should know about (and shop from!). And in turn, they’re passing the baton and spotlighting a handful of businesses they know and love. Today we have Darlene and Lizzy Okpo, founding designers of the label William Okpo.


The brand:

William Okpo, a womenswear line named after the designers’ father (though they have expanded into beauty, too, with a five piece set of lipstick and nail polish in Tumeric and Autumn Brown).

View this post on Instagram

Girlfriends 2018….📷: @ashleyjophoto

A post shared by W I L L I A M O K P O (@williamokpo) on

The designers:

Darlene and Lizzy Okpo

If we drew a three-adjective Venn diagram, William Okpo would sit in the center of:

Vivid, modern, geometric

Fantasy scenario:

It’s mid-July, and you’re getting ready for a second date—the first one was last week and it went mind-blowingly well. Today’s plan is to walk through your date’s favorite park that snakes along the river, and to end up at their favorite bench at the pier that overlooks the skyline. Usually, getting dressed for this sort of thing is a high hurdle to clear, but this morning it’s a cinch: The second date outfit recipe consists of William Okpo’s Little Lady skirt, their semitransparent Ringlet Fisherwoman hat, and a swipe of their new semi-matte lipstick. You put on two different pairs of shoes: on your left foot, the Pointe heel—a ballet slipper propped up by a tortoiseshell heel—and on your right, the sportier, nylon Lady boot, and text a picture to your friend, asking which looks better with the outfit. Waiting for her reply and admiring what you’ve put together in the mirror, you take a minute to relish in the pre-date giddiness.

Black entrepreneurship in the Okpo sisters’ words:

“Growing up in New York City, the act of walking into a Black enterprise was almost nonexistent. The local food markets, clothing stores, and beauty supply stores are some of the many businesses where it’s proven that Black people are the highest consumers. Unfortunately, these same businesses are not Black-owned. As it became clear that our dollar doesn’t stay within our community, our community realized we have a responsibility to change this narrative. As it seems, Black people have to be responsible for taking care of Black people—otherwise, if it’s left up to society, we will continue to be a disenfranchised group. Today, we try to take the extra step to buy Black when it comes to purchasing everyday essentials.”

 


Want more? Check out MR Market Strategist Elizabeth Tamkin’s database of more than 600 Black-owned brands, along with some of her personal shopping recommendations. If you have a suggestion that you think should be added, please share it in the comments.

The post We’re Dreaming About First-Date Outfits, Thanks to William Okpo appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

Lihte Has Big (and Practical) Ideas for the Future of Fashion

In this series, Man Repeller shines a light on standout independent, Black-owned fashion labels we think you should know about (and shop from!). And in turn, they’re passing the baton and spotlighting a handful of organizations and businesses they know and love. Today we have Paul-Simon Djite, co-founder of Lihte.


The brand:

Lihte, an online platform connecting brands with stylists and editors, allowing them to select samples and make a request in under 10 minutes.

The co-founder:

Paul-Simon Djite

If we drew a 3-adjective Venn diagram, Lihte would sit in the center of:

Solutions-oriented, hyper-organized, protective

Fantasy scenario:

Months from now, you’re back at work and producing the first in-person fashion editorial shoot since who-remembers-when. You’ve been sitting on this big idea that’s been logistically impossible for a while and now it’s finally coming together: the models have been cast, your favorite makeup artist is confirmed, and the rest of pre-production preparation is trucking along. The whole team is buzzing with excitement to be on set next week.

One hitch you forgot about after all those months at home: it’s a complete frenzy keeping track of samples you called in for this shoot. And then you remember: you set up an account with Lihte last year, and they’ve created a genius platform that solves for sample-trafficking as a major pain point for editors and stylists alike. You call in the shoes and jewelry you’ve been eyeing for this concept for months, and you can’t wait to pick up these Mary-Janes and these mules with a swoopy heel by Nicole Saldanã, and this sculpted ring by Luz Ortiz to see them offline. Lihte accounts for every item once confirmed, and reminds the stylists when samples are ready for pickup and when they need to be returned (in this industry, a lot of publications hold on to samples well beyond their allotted time). When you pick them up from Lihte’s studio a few days before the shoot, it’s clear that Paul treats his samples with such love and care, and leading by example, encourages you to do the same. The only thing left to do is send out the call sheet!

Black entrepreneurship in Paul-Simon’s words:

“It actually doesn’t mean so much to me to be a black business owner. It means far more to be a business owner. I think that anyone who’s endeavored to go out on a limb and start their own business has experienced their own set of challenges, be it because of their sex, race, religion, (insert differentiating attribute here), etc. As a business owner, I feel much more strongly about the one question we all have to answer: Have we created something people want?”


Want more? Check out MR Market Strategist Elizabeth Tamkin’s database of more than 600 Black-owned brands, along with some of her personal shopping recommendations. If you have a suggestion that you think should be added, please share it in the comments.

The post Lihte Has Big (and Practical) Ideas for the Future of Fashion appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

In the Market for a Statement Swimsuit? Look No Further Than Fe Noel

In this series, Man Repeller shines a light on independent, Black-owned fashion labels we think you should know about (and shop from!). And in turn, they’re passing the baton and spotlighting a handful of labels they know and love. Today we have Fe Noel, founder and designer of Fe Noel.


The brand:

Fe Noel, an eponymous womenswear label inspired by the founder’s Grenadian heritage.

If we drew a 3-adjective Venn diagram, Fe Noel would sit in the center of:

Gauzy, punchy, inventive

Fantasy scenario:

You are floating on one of those inflatable air sofas in the middle of a lake, constantly fielding compliments on your puff-sleeved bodysuit from nearby swimmers. The days are long, the water is sparkling around you, and the sun won’t set behind the trees until nine at night. After a half hour of sunbathing, you paddle back to the rocky shoreline with your hands. You dry off and root around in your tote bag for your cover-up while squinting into the sun. You can’t remember whether you packed the sheer hoodie robe or that other striped one you love so much. Turns out you packed both.

Black entrepreneurship in Fe’s words:

“Being a Black business owner right now means power. It means the ability to communicate who I am to the world. In the fashion industry, we are gravely under- and mis-represented. I have the ability to represent us in a beautiful and authentic way, and that’s powerful to me.”


Want more? Check out MR Market Strategist Elizabeth Tamkin’s database of more than 550 Black-owned brands, along with some of her personal shopping recommendations. If you have a suggestion that you think should be added, please share it in the comments.

The post In the Market for a Statement Swimsuit? Look No Further Than Fe Noel appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

Colorful Bags With Big Buckles: EDAS Is What You’ll Want to Wear to Your Future Friend Dinner

In this series, Man Repeller shines a light on standout independent, Black-owned fashion labels we think you should know about (and shop from!). And in turn, they’re passing the baton and spotlighting a handful of labels they know and love. Today we have Sade Mims, founder and designer of the accessory brand EDAS.


The brand:

EDAS, an accessories label (with a few clothing items mixed in!) that launched in 2015

The designer:

Sade Mims

If we drew a 3-adjective Venn diagram, EDAS would sit in the center of:

Earthy, sculptural, restrained

Fantasy scenario:

Walking to meet your friends for dinner wearing one of EDAS’ sold-out Delentals (a kind of asymmetrical black leather apron) over an oversized white button-down, jeans, squiggly scene-stealing Prime earrings in your lobes, and the Yshaia bag in the crook of your elbow. Walking fast, listening to a podcast. You all meet outside the restaurant and decide to wait for a table outside. You debate whether there are really two kinds of people in this world: those who scope out the menu online ahead of time, and those who let it wash over them once they sit down to eat.

Black entrepreneurship in Sade’s words:

“I have a responsibility to use my platform to authentically tell the Black story and to hire and collaborate with Black creatives—it’s imperative. I knew that was my duty in 2015, and I most certainly know that it’s even more crucial now. What we’re seeing is a revolution, but this type of uprising has been the reality for Black people for quite a while, so I’m really excited to see this unification happening on a global level.”



Check out MR Market Strategist Elizabeth Tamkin’s database of more than 550 Black-owned brands, along with some of her personal shopping recommendations. If you have a suggestion that you think should be added, please share it in the comments.

The post Colorful Bags With Big Buckles: EDAS Is What You’ll Want to Wear to Your Future Friend Dinner appeared first on Man Repeller.

Posted in Man Repeller

The Secret to Successful Search Terms on eBay, Etsy, and More

Have you signed up for MR Thoughtline yet? It’s Man Repeller’s new text-based service that lights up phone screens with good bits from around the internet, opportunities to chat with cool people, and digital recesses to help your mind take a break from the news in favor of a recipe, physical activity or, trust us, very useful WFH outfit ideas. Subscribe here.


If this story had a doormat, it would say, “THE REST IS SEARCH HISTORY,” and you might ask where I bought it. Welcome. Take a seat. Would you like something to drink? And would you like to hear the whole story of how I tracked down the Murano glass in which your drink is served? If so, you have come to the right place.

The Rest Is Search History stems from my inherent nosiness: I want to hear about other peoples’ hyper-specific search terms, guarded like sapphires at the Smithsonian, their laborious and surprising journeys down various shopping rabbit holes, and the elaborate shopping strategies they’ve honed over time.

Today’s guest is Allie Burns, a remarkably efficient and process-oriented person who knows how to find exactly what you want on the Internet. Her qualifications are impressive: In the past, she’s been able to find a Fendi backpack she stalked for two years and a coveted Miu Miu rain hat. Below, Allie details how to find high-value designer items for low prices on eBay—and how using Etsy like a social network can be the most streamlined way to find what you like.


Allie Burns, advisor in virtual communications and efficiency, vgoodthings.com

You’ve devised a particular system for shopping on eBay, specifically for fashion. Can you walk me through that? How did you cultivate this system? My dad was really into eBay when I was a kid, during the early days of eBay (1998-2002). So I understood eBay’s layout and how to search/filter eBay early. My first eBay purchase was a lot of Betty and Veronica comic books in 1998. I started buying bulk pink North Face fleeces and reselling them on eBay in 2002, making about $22 profit per jacket. I actually found it fun to be in the world of online commerce at a young age.

In college and early in my career (2010 era), I simply could not afford the clothes I wanted to wear. I wanted pleated skirts from the Prada runway, Brunello Cucinelli-level cashmere crop tops, and YSL floor-length dusters, but my wallet wasn’t really in tune with my taste. I spent many late nights browsing eBay (and Etsy and The RealReal), experimenting with search terms and “tricks” to find whatever I wanted in my wardrobe. I started to organize the most effective searches and the most effective methods of searching for a typical item. This developed over time into (1) quite a nice little wardrobe, (2) a reputation as a great gift-giver, and (3) consistent requests to “find something” for a friend.

eBay utilizes some of the same search logic as Google: This is called “Boolean” logic and allows you to use AND, OR, and NOT to get specific on the keywords included in a search. So if I want to see Chloé collection, I have to be very specific with my search, since writing “Chloe” will bring you everything with the word Chloe in it. My search for an item by chloe starts with |(CHLOÉ, chloe) (Phoebe, Philo, stella) -men -mens -see|. This ensures that I am not getting children’s dresses called “the Chloe dress,” nor am I getting See by Chloé, but I’m getting Phoebe Philo or Stella McCartney-era Chloé, which is important.

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At a certain point, I had a long Excel sheet of eBay search URLs that brought in the really good stuff. At the time, I was scraping Net-a-Porter, Barneys, and The RealReal’s designer index pages, then plugging those names into custom URLs. Once you understand Boolean logic and learn the language of an eBay search URL, you can start getting more custom in how you search.

Provided that my search was already filtering against designers appearing on Net-a-Porter (for example), I could search something more simple—like a black coat. For example searching |(coat, jacket, trench) (xs, small, 0, 00, petite) black| into eBay without the designer filter would bring you lots and lots of coats of many questionable qualities. But if you do that same search only against the Net-a-Porter designer index, you start your process with an automatic quality filter. Then you organize this search by watch count (the number of users watching an item) and voilà—you have some coat contenders for fall.

eBay’s search can be organized into an RSS feed through an RSS reader. RSS readers are a bit dated in 2020 (Google Reader discontinued in 2013, for instance), but many still exist: I use feedly.com, for example. You can plug custom searches into an RSS feed and create your own mini widget, for free! I created my first version of this in 2014 and found it extremely helpful. I wasn’t browsing eBay anymore; I was browsing my curated version of eBay.

In 2017, I worked with a fantastic developer to develop selected versions of my RSS feeds to the public through vgoodthings.com. Vgoodthings is a very simple website that runs itself (there’s no customer service or person behind this site), and the search feeds can get a bit wonky (the term “Vetements” was bringing in French auctions of bulk children’s clothes, for a minute). But the site does come through with some rare gems. I used to update the vgoodthings Instagram to show the most iconic items I was finding. It’s been a few years, but I’ll come back to it soon!

I also discovered some sites that had really useful access to “exclusive” eBay API. One of those is collectorsweekly.com, where you can organize a search based on how many people are watching a particular auction. A very helpful way to prioritize a very general search, you get the best items at the top as the “most watched.” Another is haberdashboard.com, which is a site specifically for curating the men’s search of eBay.

Specifically, what kind of fashion items do you search for? And what other items outside of that category have you found via your methods? Almost anything is on eBay. I imagine it can be a bit scary if you have hoarding compulsions. The developer I work with has repurposed the RSS feeds to find specialized music equipment. I’ve used the RSS feed to find rare plant sprouts, limited-edition Dior nail polish colors, cheap printer ink, Dolly Parton photo prints, ’80s runway invitations, Levi’s of a very particular quality for my boyfriend, forgotten dot-com-bubble branded T-shirts, and so on.

Do you keep a running list of things you’re on the lookout for (I imagine probably eBay alerts?) or is it more intuitive, like when you come across something you’d like to buy, you implement your process? A bit of both. I have RSS feeds always running against searches I’m interested in at that moment. For instance, right now I’m looking for luxury designer board games or decks of cards as a gift for someone, and I have that search plugged into all the tools with alerts.

Any other tricks for tracking things down online? When should I use eBay, and when should I search for something on Etsy or The RealReal instead?

For eBay

If you are looking for the lowest possible price for the highest quality items (i.e. you have $10 to buy something worth $1.5K), eBay delivers. It is high risk, high reward. There are sellers who don’t know the value of what they are selling, or they do what is called a “fat finger” and spell Ann Demeulemeester wrong (happens a lot) and no one can find their auction so a pair of $1,000 boots sells for $25. That’s where eBay is unique and especially rewarding.

I recommend only shopping eBay for one-size-fits-all items or items that can run the risk of being oversized without sacrificing “the look” (like jackets and sweaters). I rarely use eBay to find good shoes because it’s too much of a risk in terms of fit.

eBay is also a great place to find reference imagery or archival content. Their website only saves imagery for 30 days but it can be a great source for unique content if you are in a pinch.

For Etsy

I love Etsy for simple and harmless online browsing. In 2012, Etsy was truly for crafts, but over the years it’s developed a fantastic selection of vintage designer pieces.

Etsy also includes what I call “favorite tree links.” Located at the very bottom of the product page in fine print, Etsy links to “26 favorites,” or however many people also favorited the same item. This link takes you to a list of users who favorited said item, and then you can browse like-minded people’s favorites from there. Let’s say I spend three hours trying to find the perfect lamp shade, and you, on the other side of the world, are also trying to find the perfect lamp shade. Then it’s quite beneficial if you stumble across my endless lamp shade favorites and save yourself those three hours of cold-searching lamp shades. And if you like my taste, now you can just browse everything that I like! But beware: It seems like Etsy might be trying to phase this out, as they move the link to view who favorited a product farther and farther away from the above-the-fold eyeline.

The RealReal

Once I had grown up a bit and more dollars to my name, I started to gravitate more to The RealReal for high-price items that I could not risk buying on eBay. The RealReal allows you to return an item without much hassle (in 15 days). This means I can buy something, and if it does not fit, I can return it, which can feel revolutionary when you’re used to shopping eBay or Etsy. That being said, you will not run into $3 dollar Helmut Lang skirts on The RealReal. The prices on The RealReal speak to the true value: less risk, less reward.

Is there anything Allie Burns can’t find?!? This chrome plant potter, TBD. My boyfriend and I were debating on the name of a particular house plant, and I was using Google Images to show him the scientific name. This image showed up in the search results and caught our attention—not for the plant (although the plant is beautiful) but for the particular silver planter housing the plant.

I started by Googling keywords to find it like |(pot, planter) (chrome, silver, metallic) (round, circular) and “large”|. I probably spent an hour before realizing that the word “large” needed to be mandatory. I found some planters that were close, so I reversed-image searched those to get a bit closer. All of this was via Google. At a certain point, I went on eBay and Etsy to search the same keywords but wasn’t getting any closer. By then it had been about 2.5 hours, and I was frustrated.

I started over, went back to the original article that posted this photo and realized the designers were in Amsterdam, so I started including the keywords in Dutch and French within my search. I also targeted domains ending in .nl, .de and .fr to get some new results. This led me to something very close to the planter in the photo, but it was sold out, and I knew it still wasn’t the exact one.

After talking to a magazine editor and an interior designer about it, I finally resorted to what I could have done in the beginning: sending an Instagram message to the architects that seemingly own the planter, politely inquiring where I could find it. Now I patiently await their response.

I have reason to believe this is a custom piece, but if someone can find it, I want to meet them because I have a lot to learn from that person.

I did find many other great planters along the way, so in the end all was not lost. We did purchase a planter from eBay through this experience. It looks nothing like the one we wanted but perfectly complimented a smaller plant that needed repotting.

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Graphics by Lorenza Centi.

The post The Secret to Successful Search Terms on eBay, Etsy, and More appeared first on Man Repeller.